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Sleep apnea impacts millions of Americans every day. Likely, this condition either impacts you or someone around you. The good news is that sleep apnea can be treated. However, it is important to first understand what it is.

Here at Levata Sleep, we are eager to treat your sleep apnea. To start, here is some information about sleep apnea.

Understanding Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea is a condition in which the airway becomes partially or completely blocked, resulting in shallow or paused breathing during sleep. This interruption in breathing can occur multiple times throughout the night, leading to disruptions in sleep patterns and causing a range of symptoms. There are a couple of different types of sleep apnea:
Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA):
Obstructive Sleep Apnea is the most common type, affecting the majority of individuals diagnosed with sleep apnea. It occurs when the throat muscles relax and block the airway, leading to restricted or complete cessation of airflow. The blockage can result from various factors, such as excess throat tissue, enlarged tonsils, or a relaxed tongue, and it hinders the normal flow of air to the lungs. As a result, oxygen levels in the body decrease, and the brain prompts a brief awakening or arousal to restore breathing. These frequent disruptions prevent restful sleep and can lead to a range of health issues if left untreated.

Central Sleep Apnea (CSA):
Central Sleep Apnea is less common and differs from Obstructive Sleep Apnea in its underlying cause. In this type, the brain fails to send proper signals to the muscles that control breathing. This communication breakdown results in a temporary cessation or reduction in the effort to breathe. Unlike OSA, the airway remains open, but the brain fails to initiate the necessary muscle movements required for normal breathing. CSA is often associated with underlying conditions such as heart failure, stroke, or brainstem injury. Individuals with CSA may experience disruptions in their sleep and inadequate oxygen levels in their bodies.

Complex Sleep Apnea Syndrome (CompSA):
Complex Sleep Apnea Syndrome, also known as Mixed Sleep Apnea, is a combination of obstructive and central sleep apnea. It is characterized by an initial diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea, which later progresses to include features of Central Sleep Apnea. This transition can occur when individuals with OSA are treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, and the removal of obstruction reveals an underlying central breathing control problem. CompSA requires a specialized approach to treatment, addressing both obstructive and central components to ensure effective management.

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Understanding Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea is a condition in which the airway becomes partially or completely blocked, resulting in shallow or paused breathing during sleep. This interruption in breathing can occur multiple times throughout the night, leading to disruptions in sleep patterns and causing a range of symptoms.

There are a couple of different types of sleep apnea:

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA):
Obstructive Sleep Apnea is the most common type, affecting the majority of individuals diagnosed with sleep apnea. It occurs when the throat muscles relax and block the airway, leading to restricted or complete cessation of airflow. The blockage can result from various factors, such as excess throat tissue, enlarged tonsils, or a relaxed tongue, and it hinders the normal flow of air to the lungs. As a result, oxygen levels in the body decrease, and the brain prompts a brief awakening or arousal to restore breathing. These frequent disruptions prevent restful sleep and can lead to a range of health issues if left untreated.

Central Sleep Apnea (CSA):
Central Sleep Apnea is less common and differs from Obstructive Sleep Apnea in its underlying cause. In this type, the brain fails to send proper signals to the muscles that control breathing. This communication breakdown results in a temporary cessation or reduction in the effort to breathe. Unlike OSA, the airway remains open, but the brain fails to initiate the necessary muscle movements required for normal breathing. CSA is often associated with underlying conditions such as heart failure, stroke, or brainstem injury. Individuals with CSA may experience disruptions in their sleep and inadequate oxygen levels in their bodies.

Complex Sleep Apnea Syndrome (CompSA):
Complex Sleep Apnea Syndrome, also known as Mixed Sleep Apnea, is a combination of obstructive and central sleep apnea. It is characterized by an initial diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea, which later progresses to include features of Central Sleep Apnea. This transition can occur when individuals with OSA are treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, and the removal of obstruction reveals an underlying central breathing control problem. CompSA requires a specialized approach to treatment, addressing both obstructive and central components to ensure effective management.

Symptoms of Sleep Apnea

Recognizing the signs of sleep apnea is crucial for seeking proper diagnosis and treatment. The following symptoms may indicate the presence of sleep apnea: 

  • Loud and persistent snoring.
  • Frequent pauses or gaps in breathing during sleep.
  • Excessive daytime sleepiness or fatigue.
  • Morning headaches or dry mouth.
  • Difficulty concentrating and memory problems.
  • Irritability or mood changes.

Oral Devices for Sleep Apnea

Oral devices, also known as oral appliances, are a non-invasive and effective treatment option for sleep apnea. Here at Lavata Sleep, we specialize in using oral devices to treat sleep apnea. These devices are custom-made and fit inside your mouth to help keep your airway open during sleep. They work by repositioning the jaw, preventing the collapse of soft tissues that cause breathing disruptions and snoring.

There are different types of oral devices available for treating sleep apnea, including:

Mandibular Advancement Devices (MADs): MADs are the most common type of oral device used for sleep apnea. They resemble mouthguards or dental retainers and are designed to push the lower jaw forward slightly. This forward position helps to open up the airway and prevent obstruction.

These oral devices are typically prescribed by qualified dentists who specialize in sleep apnea treatment. The dentist will evaluate your specific condition, assess your oral health, and determine the most suitable type of oral device for you.

One of the advantages of oral devices is their convenience and ease of use. They are compact, portable, and don’t require a power source like CPAP machines. Additionally, they are comfortable to wear and allow for natural jaw movement and speech while you sleep.

It’s important to note that oral devices are most effective for mild to moderate cases of sleep apnea. Severe cases may still require other treatment options like CPAP therapy or surgery. Therefore, it’s crucial to consult with a qualified dentist or sleep specialist who can evaluate your condition and recommend the most appropriate treatment approach for you.

If you’re seeking an alternative to CPAP machines or other sleep apnea treatments, oral devices can provide a comfortable and effective solution. Discuss your options with a sleep specialist or dentist experienced in sleep apnea treatment to determine if an oral device is a suitable choice for you.

Causes of Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder characterized by repetitive pauses in breathing during sleep. It can occur due to various factors that contribute to airway obstruction or improper signaling between the brain and muscles involved in breathing. Some common causes of sleep apnea include:

Obesity: Excess weight can lead to the accumulation of fatty tissues in the throat and neck, narrowing the airway and causing breathing difficulties during sleep.

Anatomical Factors: Certain structural abnormalities in the upper airway, such as enlarged tonsils, a deviated septum, or a small jaw, can contribute to airway blockage and increase the risk of sleep apnea.

Age: Sleep apnea becomes more common as individuals age. The loss of muscle tone in the throat and tongue with aging can contribute to airway collapse during sleep.

Family History: There is a genetic component to sleep apnea, with a higher risk if you have a family history of the condition.

Gender: Men are more likely to develop sleep apnea than women, although the risk increases in women after menopause.

Alcohol and Sedative Use: The use of alcohol, sedatives, or tranquilizers can relax the muscles in the throat and interfere with normal breathing patterns during sleep.

Smoking: Smoking can cause inflammation and fluid retention in the upper airway, leading to airway narrowing and increased risk of sleep apnea.

Medical Conditions: Certain medical conditions, such as hypertension, congestive heart failure, diabetes, and hormonal disorders like hypothyroidism, can increase the risk of sleep apnea.

It’s important to note that while these factors may increase the likelihood of developing sleep apnea, not everyone with these risk factors will develop the condition. If you suspect you may have sleep apnea or are experiencing symptoms like loud snoring, daytime sleepiness, or frequent awakenings during the night, it’s important to consult with a healthcare professional for a proper diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

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Sleep Apnea Treatment in Michigan

Sleep apnea treatment in Michigan is readily available through providers like Levata Sleep. If you suspect you have sleep apnea, Levata Sleep can offer comprehensive services, including consultations, helping facilitate sleep apnea testing, and personalized treatment options. Their team of experts will guide you through the diagnostic process, which may involve a sleep study to assess your sleep patterns and identify the severity of your condition. Based on the results, they can recommend suitable treatments, such as oral appliances or CPAP alternatives, tailored to your specific needs. With Levata Sleep’s expertise and dedication to improving sleep health, you can receive effective sleep apnea treatment and experience better overall well-being.

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What is sleep apnea? 

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder characterized by repeated interruptions in breathing during sleep. These interruptions, known as apneas, occur when the upper airway becomes partially or completely blocked, leading to brief periods of oxygen deprivation. Common symptoms include loud snoring, daytime fatigue, morning headaches, and restless sleep. Sleep apnea can have serious health consequences if left untreated, such as increased risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke. Diagnosis usually involves a sleep study to assess breathing patterns during sleep, and treatment options include continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, oral appliances, lifestyle changes, and in some cases, surgery. It is important to see a specialist such as Levata Sleep if you suspect you have sleep apnea to prevent potential complications and improve overall sleep quality and health.

Sleep Apnea Treatment Marquette MI

If you’re in Marquette, MI, and seeking effective sleep apnea treatment, Levata Sleep is here to help. Our experienced team specializes in treating sleep disorders, including sleep apnea. We offer comprehensive services, including consultations, and personalized treatment plans tailored to your specific needs.

Contact Levata Sleep for Sleep Apnea Treatment

Sleep apnea can have a real-life impact on your life. If you’re in need of sleep apnea treatment in Marquette, MI, don’t hesitate to contact Levata Sleep. Our expert team is dedicated to helping individuals like you overcome sleep apnea and improve their overall well-being. We offer personalized treatment plans tailored to your specific needs. Whether you require oral appliance therapy, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) alternatives, or other effective treatments, we are here to provide the care and support you need. Take the first step towards better sleep and a healthier life by reaching out to Levata Sleep today.